Businesses accepting non-private cryptos should explain the implications to customers.

When privacy matters, should sites accepting non-private cryptos mention the implications?


  • Total voters
    7

TsuyokuNaritai

Active Member
May 24, 2014
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Imagine a woman goes to a website to discreetly buy a pregnancy test. The site invites her to enter her email into a payment web form for a 10% discount.

Days later, at work, she overhears that she wasn’t considered for a promotion because they found out about the pregnancy test. Apparently a list of email addresses of customers who bought it is publicly accessible on the web, and searchable on Google. Anyone who knows her phone number can search and find out about her private affairs.

She confronts the company, and they laugh at her. They say that’s just how that particular web form works - it broadcasts all emails of customers and sellers entered into it to the world. They say it wasn’t their responsibility to warn her, and that if she’d taken the time to fully research and understand how that type of web form works before using it, she’d have known that purchases made with it could only be private if she used an email address not tied to her identity.

Is that fair? Shouldn’t the company have pointed this out when they presented the web form? Especially when there are other web forms they could have used that are perfectly capable of not broadcasting her secrets to the world.
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It’s sometimes easy to forget that many things about crypto are frequently not well understood by the general public. It needn’t matter when buying alpaca socks, but when it's a transaction where privacy matters the facts should be made clear. It’s well known that many users don’t understand that they’re broadcasting their financial activities to the world. By assuming that customers will just automatically know this, businesses are negligently exposing customers and clients to privacy risks.

Any business selling a product or service where privacy may be important, and accepting non-private crypto as payment, has an ethical obligation to clearly explain the implications of this for their customers' privacy.
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Do you agree, and if so, what would be the best way of getting the message across?

We would need to handle it carefully. Here’s what we don’t want to do:
  • We don’t want hurt crypto or give people another reason to bash it. Non-private crypto is perfectly fine as long the businesses show due diligence in protecting customer privacy by ensuring they are being made aware of the implications. But at the same time, it’s good and right to highlight legitimate concerns and risks that customers & businesses face when using non-private cryptos. It’s about making sure customers are rightly informed of the issues and that alternatives exist.
  • We don’t want to bring the law into it, except perhaps as a counterargument to FUD about the legal status of private crypto. Yes, business that ask customers to pay in non-private crypto without explaining the implications to clients/customers when there's a reasonable expectation of privacy may be recklessly exposing themselves to legal implications in some jurisdictions. And not even bad laws either, valuable laws that protect the privacy of ordinary citizens. But business owners with intelligence will figure that out themselves, we don’t need to play that card. It should be about honest, well informed trade between free citizens. It's ironic though how private cryptos have been repeatedly beaten over the head with allegations of illegality and nefariousness by some supporters of non-private cryptos, when in truth it's the other way around.
 
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TsuyokuNaritai

Active Member
May 24, 2014
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A conversation by dazbarlby on the same subject...

Jane: Bitcoin is great, easy and so secure?
Bob: Hmmmm...
Jane: What do you mean Hmmmm…
Bob: Let me ask you something… do you enjoy getting cold calls?
Jane: No! Of course I don’t, I find them a real pest.
Bob: So, is your number unlisted/ex-directory?
Jane: It sure is! I don’t want strangers knowing my number and I hate companies calling me.
Bob: I know what you mean, your phone number is private and you only want people you trust to have it.
Jane: That’s right… where are you going with this?
Bob: Like a telephone directory holding phone numbers for anybody to view and use, bitcoin keeps a ledger of every single transaction you and everybody has made and will make in the future. That ledger is known as the blockchain and can be viewed by anybody.
Jane: Wow!
Bob: The problem is those transactions can be linked and tracked in such a way that people with the right knowledge can find all your past transactions and even know how much money you have in your wallet.
Jane: I thought bitcoin was anonymous and secure!?
Bob: Unfortunately that’s a misconception many people have. Bitcoin is secure in as much as you can’t double spend but your transaction history is completely open for all to see.
Jane: OMG… There would be riots if everybody was able to view other people’s bank transactions…
Bob: I know, and can you imagine when Bitcoin is used more widely…. Companies will start tracing their customer’s transactions and merging it with other information they have to find out what they have purchased and how much is in their account. Services will pop up inviting you to track your partners’ transactions and much more. Not to mention what criminals will be able to do with such information… To me this is very scary.
Jane: It sounds scary to me too… What can I do to protect myself?
Bob: I would recommend you use an anonymous coin, such as Darkcoin
Jane: What is Darkcoin?
Bob: Darkcoin is an anonymous cryptocurrency based on Bitcoin but it has privacy at its heart and obfuscates/hides your coins in the blockchain by mixing them with other coins on the network. It does this when you’re not using your wallet so your anonymous coins are available to spend when you need them.
Jane: That sounds great but I can spend my Bitcoins everywhere and more companies and services and popping up all the time. Where can I spend my Darkcoin?
Bob: Because Darkcoin is based on Bitcoin, there would be very little effort for all those services to start accepting Darkcoin too. The problem is Darkcoin is still a young coin in comparison to Bitcoin and many people haven’t heard about it and the many advantages it has over Bitcoin.
Jane: That’s fab… So how else does Darkcoin differ?
Bob: Did I mention instant transactions?...
To be continued…..
 

TsuyokuNaritai

Active Member
May 24, 2014
181
102
103
Some discussion from bitcointalk to encourage some here...

camosoul said:
BrainShutdown said:
camosoul said:
strix said:
...This is precisely what we need more of. Your guidelines are just what is needed if DRK is to gain mainstream acceptance--totally positive, non-combative, informative and G-rated... T & A will get the kids leering, but it is their parent's wallets that will determine whether DRK survives as the shunned tool of the disreputable, or the shinning knight who defends the privacy of ordinary citizens, and makes possible assistance to those suffering under totalitarian regimes...

Dazbarlby, your "Conversation of Jane & Bob," is masterful; easy to follow, brief and to the point. The "to be continued..." is wonderful, creating suspense and expectation. Various versions need to be posted in as many venues as possible. Think comics (mentioned already), live acted on youtube, animated, etc. The series should be branded... something along the lines of "Darkcoin Theater Theater presents: A conversation with Jane and Bob." "Darkcoin Theater presents: Jane and Bob at the Bank." "Darkcoin Theater presents: Jane and Bob go shopping." "Darkcoin Theater presents: Jane and Bob shop for fun things to do together." Which of course segues into TsuyokuNaritai's idea above with "Darkcoin Theater presents: Jane and Bob get a pregnancy test." It seems I remember seeing we have a Classical composer in residence around here. He might be convinced to do the soundtrack. :)

https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=421615.msg8983772#msg8983772
In an effort to catch Dark Markets, such as the original Silk Road, a large govenrment/media sponsored campaign aimed at saying BitCoin was Anonymous was launched. We all know it isn't, but the point was to create an uproar while telling all the idiots that it was anon when it's not, so that they would get caught. It was a two-pronged attack. You first have to undo all that FUD... Most people who ahve heard of Bitcoin still think it's anonoymous when nothing could be farther from the truth... Your Bank Account is more private than BitCoin. A lot more private.

https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=421615.msg8984350#msg8984350
True! But it is only private because of some laws and we know laws can [and will] be changed.

Darkcoin doesn't rely on any laws (except mathematical ones) and those don't change.

What was Darksent+ cannot be UnDarksent+


https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=421615.msg8984417#msg8984417
Worse, the laws don't apply to the government. They made them, they never obey them, and they always exempt themselves anyway... The Only Ones.

But that's really not the point. Nothing at all can stop BitCoin from broadcasting every single detail about you money and what you do with it. It's designed to spread every tiny financial detail about you everywhere. It does this by design. It's what it was made to do. It's creator is hiding, but he designed it to expose you... DRK's designer is exposed, but he's designing it to enforce your 4th Amendment Rights and no one can violate it, not even the government.

https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=421615.msg8984510#msg8984510
 
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